Area Emergency Services Looking for Help

first_imgBy John Burton“Nobody really thinks about us, until we’re needed,” said Josh Sanders, this year’s Red Bank volunteer Fire Department chief.Like many emergency service organizations in New Jersey, some rescue squads and volunteer fire departments in this area are seeing dwindling membership and are looking for people who can answer calls when many of their neighbors are at work.The Red Bank fire department, consisting of six companies around the 1.7-mile borough, has seen a decrease in the number of members over the years – especially from the 1970s when membership was so high, new members were admitted only when a vacancy occurred, Sanders said.Back in 1990 total membership was 200 to 225, he said. Now, total membership is 120 to 150. Active members, those who are regularly available to answer calls and participate in activities, total 75 to 80.“With the lesser membership [it’s] fewer people doing more things,” including responding to tripped alarms, serving on the various committees, he said. “The workload is more than it would be with a full roster.”Bill Kramer, acting director of the Division of Fire Safety of the state Depart­ment of Community Affairs, said volunteering for emergency services has changed over the years.“Volunteerism today is much different than it was years ago, from a commitment standpoint,” Kramer said.It was common for women in past generations to stay home and for men to work, usually only one job. In today’s economy, for many families that just isn’t an option, with both working, sometimes with multiple jobs, he said.“Obviously, it’s an issue,” for organizations to increase or even maintain membership given those factors, Kramer said. Retention of members is important “because you’ve made a commitment with them with respect to training and experience.”Since 1991 there has been an overall decrease across the board of about 10 percent in volunteer fire companies in New Jersey, according Kramer, though some areas have been hit harder than others.In Red Bank the volunteer shortage is worse for the first aid squad than the fire company, Sanders acknowledged, explaining the squad comes under the fire department’s purview.“We’re really hurting for members,” he said.Red Bank First Aid Squad members Tom Cosgrove, left, and Shean Opie with a squad ambulance. The organization is looking for new members.The squad, which has 10 members – six of whom are active – there is a real need for new volunteers, said Tom Cosgrove and Shean Opie, two longtime members.The greatest need is for volunteers during daytime hours. The squad has been relying on mutual aid assistance from surrounding towns to pick up the slack, they said.About 15 or 20 years ago the squad had about 40 members, Cosgrove said.Last year the Red Bank squad responded to 800 calls, according to Opie.The squad is actively seeking members and will be holding an open house and barbecue 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 23, at its building, 151 Spring St.Opie and Cosgrove said the squad also participates in numerous community events, such as the 9/11 memorial service, to heighten people’s awareness of the organization.“We’re trying to encourage that sense of duty in people,” Cosgrove said.For those willing to volunteer their time to emergency services, it is time consuming to get and maintain certification. There can be an out-of-pocket cost for that training.Training requirements have gotten more stringent, according to Kim Ambrose, a trained first responder for both the Fair Haven and Little Silver squads. The number of hours it takes to get certification is now 300 hours. In addition, members must obtain an additional 48 educational units; state resources pay for only the first 24 units, referred to as “the core,” she said.“It is something that you have be dedicated to,” Cosgrove said, noting that in Red Bank there is a long tradition of volunteer service handed down from generation to generation.The same is certainly true for the fire department, Sanders said. Those families are “the threads of the community.”With some members, however, they are “interested but they burn out. And they have other commitments that pull them away.”Ambrose believes that in some regards the training may be unnecessarily arduous and discourage participation.“First aid doesn’t change that much,” she said. “If someone is bleeding, you stop the bleeding. If someone is not breathing, you give them oxygen and get them to the hospital.”The training is vital, said Christopher Rinn, the state Department of Health’s assistant commissioner for public health, infrastructure, laboratories and emergency preparedness. “There’s a real need to keep up with changing technology, training advances, quite frankly, the latest in lifesaving methods.”Communities are looking at ways to continue to supply services, including entering into shared service agreements, consolidation and using paid services.Many towns also are offering incentives such as contributions to a pension fund for firefighters or perks like beach badges for shore communities, Kramer said.Ambrose saw another way to help bolster the rolls. She established a first aid cadet program in Little Silver about 10 years ago. “I was really looking for something for my kids when they were in high school,” she said. Over the years she has seen the kids return from college for summer break and jump in to give the longtime squad members a bit of break.Her next project will be trying to recruit stay-at-home-moms – and dads – to volunteer and hopefully increase the number of those available for day calls.last_img read more

Keeping the Lights On and the Fires Out in Monmouth Beach

first_imgBy Jim McConvilleMONMOUTH BEACH _ There are two lights on either side of Bill Marsh’s driveway that are unlike any others on the street. They may not be illuminated every night, but when he flicks them on from a switch in his living room, a smile unfolds across his face. The lights are warm with history, and their soft light ignites the clearest of memories.A natural storyteller, Marsh glows with excitement as he recounts the tale of his more than 50-year residence in the same house, 70 years as a firefighter and decades of dedication to his family and community.“While I was in service, I saved up $400,” he said. “I wanted a motorcycle but my father didn’t want that for me, so he took it to the borough hall and bought this lot. I tore down two old houses and started building this one in 1950.”Marsh went to Long Branch High School but left early to join the Navy. Returning in 1946, he joined the borough’s fire department, a company he was active in even before leaving for military service.“A lot of the original firefighters left and they let the kids help,” he said. “I started when I was about 12. It was quite a thing to get mixed up with the fire company years ago. Close to a hundred members when I first started.”Honored last month for 70 years of service in the Monmouth Beach Fire Department (MBFD), Marsh has dedicated his life to the community. He became fire chief in 1960 and began serving as the borough electrician in 1965, two positions his father, Herbert Marsh, also held.ill Marsh, bottom row, center, with a group of fellow Monmouth Beach firefighters on Sept. 13, 1947, helping the Red Bank Fire Department celebrate its 75th anniversary. Back row, from left: James R. Maney, Harry West, Chief Walter Roe, Robert Burns. Middle row: Walter Mihm, Ira Miller Jr. and Andrew Nilsen.Marsh’s work as an electrician and firefighter became a family affair. His late wife, Myrtle, would often drive the dump truck while Marsh would haul out a stepladder to climb and replace the burned out bulbs in the streetlights on Ocean Avenue. His son-in-law, Kevin Keeshan, and grandsons, Brian and Kevin, Jr., are also members of the MBFD. In fact, the Monmouth Beach Fire Department roster is dotted with Marsh names.Marsh recounts tales of rescues during massive house fires and harrowing floods as if they were just another day at the office. When asked about his proudest moment as a firefighter, he modestly struggles to talk about himself. He settles on autumn 1960, when Hurricane Donna had flooded most of the town.“Johnny Peterson lived on Johnson Street, and he was handicapped,” Marsh said. “I picked him up from his bed, carried him out and got him in the rowboat. I rowed him back to the fire department.”Even when discussing the fire department and his life in Monmouth Beach, Marsh can’t help but credit the others who helped to shape the town, as well as his beloved, “Myrt.” The two met in North Long Branch School; she was a Girl Scout and he was a Boy Scout. She started the Lady’s Fire Auxiliary in Monmouth Beach. Once, when a meeting was delayed because the trucks had not been pulled out, Myrtle got into the truck and pulled it out of the garage herself. To this day, she is the only woman to ever drive a MBFD truck.Marsh describes the difficulties of fighting fires years ago in a small town. “The water mains weren’t as big as they are now,” he said. “We had to lay out how we were going to attack if we had fires. The fire at the Monmouth Beach Inn we pumped out of the river and used the main on Riverdale Avenue.”He became an instrumental member of the truck committee that secured the department’s first 100-foot tower truck.Now, a month before his 90th birthday, Marsh is optimistic about the future of his hometown department.“You gotta be young,” he said. “We still have kids that are active. They play ball in the summer. We’ve got a good team.”When asked what it meant to serve the community for so long, he answered without hesitation.“I never looked at it like that,” he said. “I just did my job. When the whistle blew, you’d go.”The lamps on either side of Marsh’s driveway offer a dusty glow in the blue winter afternoon, a reminder of the duty they once accomplished. When turned on, they shine the same golden light they once shined over Ocean Avenue. They are the same lamps that Marsh once stood on a stepladder to replace, while Myrtle kept the dump truck running below.last_img read more

Bomber boys romp to provincial soccer berth with 3-0 win over Creston

first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers pitched a pair of shutouts en route to capturing the Kootenay High School AA Boy’s Soccer Championships Saturday in Creston.Simon Sheppard scored twice and Ryan Lewis added a single sparking the Bombers past the Prince Charles Comets 3-0 in the Championship Final Saturday afternoon.”The team showed superior possession play throughout the tournament,” the coaching staff off Dave and Jamie Spendlove exclaimed after the game.LVR entered the game as the top-ranked team and received a bye into the semi final of the six-team tournament.The Bombers advanced to the final by easily picking apart the David Thompson Lakers of Invermere 5-0. Lewis led the charge offensively with a pair of goals. Danny Rodman, Luis Loeschnick, and Cormac Southam, on a penalty shot, also scored for the Bombers.The Lakers got past Stanley Humphries Rockers in quarterfinal play.Andrew Woodward and Cole Sutherland registered wins in goal for the Bombers.LVR now advances to the 16-team B.C. High School Boy’s Soccer Championships November 19-21 in Burnaby.OVERTIME: Saturday’s win marks the first time in three years a team from LVR has advanced to the boy’s soccer provincials. The past two seasons, at the AAA level, Mount Baker Trojans of Cranbrook defeated the Bombers to advance the the provincial tournament — 3-2 in 2010 and 3-1 in overtime in 2011. . . .The Bombers padded their goal average stats with the two shutouts. In 11 games this season, LVR has scored 50 times while allowing only four goals.last_img read more

Wanted bulletin issued for attempted murder accused

first_imgMagistrate Leron Daly on Friday ordered the Guyana Police Force to issue a wanted bulletin for a Grove, East Bank Demerara (EBD) man who stabbed another following a row over the use of a yard toilet.Calvin George, 19, was expected to appear in the Georgetown Magistrates’ Court on Friday last, but failed to so do.The teenager is accused of wounding Orin Peters with intent to commit murder on April 11, 2018 at Kaneville, EBD.According to reports, Peters and George argued over the use of a toilet. Peters informed the court that George then armed himself with a knife and attacked him, stabbing him to his abdomen.Peters was picked up and rushed to the Diamond Diagnostic Hospital, and was later transferred to the Georgetown Public Hospital, where he was treated.George was placed on $200,000 bail on the condition that he lodges his passport with the Police.He was also ordered to not make contact with the VC or witnesses, or to cause anyone to do same. Also, as a condition of bail, George was required to report to the Grove Police Station every Friday until completion of the trial.The matter has been adjourned to June 22, 2018.last_img read more

Man saves boy’s life on beach just weeks after doing life-saving course

first_imgA Co Donegal man saved the life of a young boy in America – just weeks after doing his first life-saving course.Brian Dolan was delighted after doing the course in his native village of Creeslough back in April.But little did he think he would actually use those skills after finding a boy in a collapsed state along the Florida coastline. Brian and his family were on the trip of a lifetime in August.They were due to come home to Ireland when they were walking along the beach only to discover a 14-year-old boy lying face down on the shoreline.Brian initially called for help and appealed for anybody around who could do CPR but he soon realised he was the only one with any training in the life-saving technique.He explained: “There was a few young kids slashing about in the water and there was a woman taking photographs just off to our right. “The next thing I knew there was squealing and roaring and she was shouting and here was a young lad face down in the water.“The waves were bringing him in and the waves were bringing him back out again. Then when he came in a second time and back out again she went in after him. I thought it might have been a young man messing about at first.“She dived into the water and had her right arm around his chest and her other hand was holding her phone out of water. Down I went anyway and grabbed the young fella off her and took him up to the edge of the beach, he was completely flaccid, just completely out of it.“I shouted to see if there was anyone else who could do CPR before I would start doing it but there was no reply.”His wife Margaret Anne rang for medical help and sought to get a defibrillator while Brian began doing what he was taught to do during his recent first responder training with the Creeslough Community First Responders group. He said it was a scary experience but that was grateful to have undertaken the CPR training so recently.He said: “It was scary. The eyes were gone in the back of his head and he was out of it altogether. The first seven or eight compressions I did there was a spout of water coming out 12 to 18 inches high. It was a solid flow of water.“I did 30 compression but there was no way to do mouth to mouth. I tried to do it through his nose but it was just like blowing into a bucket of water. There was just bubbles coming out.“I did another 30 compression’s and it still did the same again. Then there wasn’t as much water coming out. I’m not sure if it was on the third or fourth set of compression’s but he coughed. “We turned him on his side and we got him sitting he was coughing and getting sick. At this stage we had him sitting up and the lifeguard came, three or four of them on quad bikes.“They put oxygen on him and within a minute we heard the ambulance. They picked him up on the back of the quad and brought him to the ambulance and he was brought away”.Once Brian returned to his hotel room and later in the evening he made contact with the boy’s family who said they were expecting him to kept in hospital overnight.However, went to meet the family again before he left the hotel the following day he was told the boys condition had deteriorated and he was in intensive care.He remained there for a few days due to complications with his breathing and heart beat.Thankfully he did recover enough to be discharged later that week.Brendan said he left the US with hauntingly vivid image of the young boys eyes when he first encountered him.However, having remained in contact with his family after the incident they have since sent him a recent image of a happy, healthy-looking lad which he said brought him a sense of closure on the incident.“That picture has done a lot for me,” he told the group.“I was told after the incident that if wasn’t for the CPR he wouldn’t have made it but you just go into autopilot.“The training was invaluable as I didn’t get time to think on what to do, so I’m very thankful for the training I got,” Brian added.Brian learned CPR through the Creeslough Community First Responders group who work alongside the National Ambulance Service by proving first response in the Creeslough community to persons who have heart attack, cardiac arrest, strokes or choking symptoms.They run regular courses and can be contacted through their Facebook page “Creeslough Defib”.Man saves boy’s life on beach just weeks after doing life-saving course was last modified: October 7th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Del Norte sweeps Loggers to keep pace in Big 5 race

first_imgCrescent City >> Allison Douglas allowed just four hits and struck out five, as the Del Norte Warriors remained undefeated in Big 5 Conference play with a 3-0 victory in the opening game of a doubleheader at Del Norte High School Tuesday afternoon.The contest began as a pitcher’s duel between Del Norte’s Douglas and Eureka’s Alyssa Jimenez, with neither side being able to get on the scoreboard in the first two innings. The Warriors had their share of opportunities early, but Jimenez was able …last_img read more

Momento’s magic mohair exports

first_img7 April 2006It started with three unemployed but expert weavers and a scraped-together initial investment of R4 000. Today Momento’s of Africa is a world-class producer of luxury mohair textiles and apparel, exporting over 70% of its products to countries such as Germany, Canada and Dubai.The company is based in Port Elizabeth, the self-proclaimed mohair capital of the world. Mohair, produced from the Angora goats, has been called “the animal-lover’s fur” because the fine and luxurious fibre is produced by shearing, not killing.For many years, South Africa has been the biggest producer of mohair, most of it coming from farms in the semi-desert Karoo region. The fibre is auctioned in Port Elizabeth in Nelson Mandela Bay.Today over 60% of the world’s mohair passes through the city in one form or another. This has allowed producers of finished mohair goods such as Momento’s of Africa to prosper.From self-help to world-classMomento’s – the odd spelling is intentional – has its roots in a small self-help project run in the 1980s by British expert weaver Lin Smith at the Port Elizabeth technical college. Called Pencen, the programme taught unemployed people to weave Xhosa tapestries, to allow them to make a living.But when funding dried up in the early 1990s the progamme was forced to shut down, leaving its graduates and trainers with good skills but no outlet for their products. Lin saw this as an opportunity and, with Pencen trainers Beauty Samana and Thandiwe Ngidi, set up a specialist tapestry curio shop at Port Elizabeth Airport with that scraped-together R4 000.Their success was immediate, with the shop gaining a reputation for high-quality mohair products by word of mouth.“Tourists started telling us how much they loved our blankets,” Roger Smith, Lin’s husband, told South African Exporter. “Then they started importing them in small quantities and started selling them in shops in their neighbourhoods. That’s how we started exporting.“The shop became famous, particularly internationally. We had write-ups in American magazines as the best place to buy curios.”ExpansionThe initial success led to a rapid expansion requiring new premises, and the airport gave the company an old hangar to use. As production increased, Momento’s had a ready supply of skilled labour – former employees and graduates of the Pencen programme, all trained by Lin.In 1998 output was increased, with new merchandise – scarves, capes, ponchos, shawls, pullovers, hats and berets – being brought into production. Overseas distributors were secured, and today Momento’s exports 70% of its products to Germany, Canada, the UK, France, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Dubai, Australia and New Zealand.By January 2002 the company had secured enough orders to keep its staff busy for the entire year.“We couldn’t take any more orders for that year,” Roger told SA Exporter. “People also wanted their goods as soon as they ordered, they didn’t want to wait for us to manufacture them some time in the distant future.”So the company expanded again, moving into a new factory the following year. Today Momento’s has two shops – Momento’s of Africa and Mogo – in Port Elizabeth and another, Moyisa, in Durban. There’s also the BabyMo factory and showroom in Port Elizabeth, where the public is welcome to both view products and watch the company’s crafters at work.International brandsMomento’s has launched a number of brand names that have come to denote quality all over the world.BabyMo products are woven from the wool of kid – or baby – Angora goats, resulting in extremely fine and silky textiles with none of the scratchiness that can be associated with mohair. Its popularity was confirmed when it won a Best New Product award at the prestigious New York Home Textile Show in spring 2005.The Shangora range is knitted – not woven – in kid wool, while the imiBoniso brand takes Momento’s back to its roots, with stunning mohair tapestries and wall hangings done to both modern and traditional Xhosa designs.With all its international success, Momento’s remains a very South African company, committed to the country’s future.With 69% of its shares black owned, it was named one of South Africa’s top 300 black economic empowerment companies at both the 2004 and 2005 Impumelelo Awards. Its staff is made up almost entirely of black people, most of them previously unemployed, and a fair number disabled.Momento’s also actively encourages its staff to acquire new skills, spending about 16% of its income on training courses.Information sourced from Momento’s of Africa and The South African Exporter. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

How You Lose Your Cultural Values

first_imgA person with poor values and morals can damage your culture and cause people to believe something about your company that isn’t true. Someone who is willing to do things that are illegal or immoral can give others the perception that these things are condoned—even when they are not.If you allow someone to act outside of what you profess to be your beliefs and values, you are in a sense condoning their value systems through an unwillingness to confront their poor behavior or prevent it once it has come to light. The longer a person (or persons) are allowed to continue to do things that conflict with your cultural values, the more they diminish your values—and your moral authority.If someone on your team is willing to lie or mislead a client, for that client, the person who lied is a representation of your organizations cultural values. Even if this is not true. And even if this is not fair. If there are no consequences for their behavior, acceptance is the same as condoning the behavior.If someone on your team is willing to accept money that doesn’t belong to them, then your clients—and your employees—will see evidence that the cultural values of your company are ones that allow for theft. If the person who has violated your values is left in their position without repercussions, their behavior has been accepted.Leaders who mistreat their employees, using force instead of inspiration and influence, leaning on a dominator hierarchy instead of a growth hierarchy (the first being positional authority, the latter being an other-oriented, moral authority), that behavior is indicative of the leadership team—even if it is nothing close to universally true.The worst behavior, when condoned or accepted, is how you lose your company’s cultural values. Unless you do something. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Beermen, Painters try to bolster Q’Final bid

first_imgFire hits houses in Mandaluyong City BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Read Next “Alaska is not a team you can relax against,” said RoS coach Caloy Garcia referring to the Aces. “We have to come out with the mentality of wanting to win rather than just playing the game.” MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:33Leo Austria, SMB wary of ‘more experienced’ Hotshots ahead of PBA Finals rematch00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LATEST STORIES Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  PH fighters bag 2 golds LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversarycenter_img Grand Slam-seeking San Miguel Beer and Rain or Shine will shoot for wins on Wednesday that would push them closer to a twice-to-beat bonus in the quarterfinals of the PBA Governors’ Cup.And it’s not much of an advantage that the Beermen and the Elasto Painters will be facing teams that have scraped the bottom of the barrel. In fact, it could work against the two squads in the doubleheader at Ynares Sports Center in Antipolo City.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president The Beermen take on Phoenix Fuel at 7 p.m., right after the 4:15 p.m. duel between the Painters and the Alaska Aces.San Miguel coach Leo Austria got first-hand experience how it is paying against a team with nothing to lose when the Beermen needed a big finish and a huge game from June Mar Fajardo to subdue KIA Picanto, 118-112, in what he aptly described as “an ugly win.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“It is a wake-up call for us,” said Austria who is hoping to bring to the illustrious franchise its second Grand Slam.Rain or Shine will also guard against complacency when it battles Alaska. E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa View commentslast_img read more

Alejandro cherishes time with Jarin: ‘He’s like a father figure to us’

first_imgJohn Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. “Every night he’ll send me a random text, and we’re always talking. That’s extra special for me.” Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC UST averts winless season, beats UE ‘Pamana’: Mausoleum caretaker cherishes humble work for family PLAY LIST 03:06‘Pamana’: Mausoleum caretaker cherishes humble work for family02:36Archers, Eagles favorites to win UAAP Season 8000:58UE’s rookie coach Silva ‘honored’ to be in same league as champion coaches, former mentors01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LATEST STORIES Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 READ: Alejandro laments not playing more years under NU coach Jarin“My UAAP career has been fun especially my last year with coach Jamike, that’s really been my best memory,” said Alejandro, who played in his final UAAP game after NU lost to University of the Philippines, 106-81, Saturday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“What made it special was I had the chance to play under coach Jamike who we all know is a multi-titled coach in the UAAP and the NCAA.”READ: Jarin takes blame for NU’s failed Final Four bidcenter_img QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Read Next Jarin was an eight-time UAAP juniors champion with Ateneo and a one-time NCAA seniors champion with San Beda and that was the kind of pedigree that Alejandro admired.Another thing that drew Alejandro, who is a one-time UAAP champion back in Season 77, to Jarin was the trust the mentor gave him.“The sweetest thing was he allowed Matt (Salem) and I to be captains.”Alejandro added Jarin rarely talked to them about basketball and evoked an aura not of a coach’s, but of a father figure.“He’s like a father figure to us, we actually talk more about other things not about basketball,” said Alejandro, who finished with 16 points and eight assists.ADVERTISEMENT Jay Alejandro. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netJ-Jay Alejandro played just one year for National University head coach Jamike Jarin, but the graduating Bulldog said that lone year has been the most special in his UAAP tenure.And all that was thanks to Jarin.ADVERTISEMENT Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion View commentslast_img read more