Gray by Day, Bright by Night

first_img Save Your Eyes from the Scourge of the Screens with the Best Blue-Light-Blocking Glasses for Men Editors’ Recommendations Every season Naked & Famous’ Brandon Svarc (the Dominique Ansel of denim) releases fun, exciting and innovative jeans that you never even thought could exist. From scratch and sniff pants (do you prefer raspberry or mint?) to color changing jeans to a pair of very heavy jeans (32 ounces – the heaviest in the world). This season is for skateboarders, and those who love to walk in the dark.Reflective denim. It’s gray by day, bright by night.Brandon Svarc and his team has taken denim to a whole new level by baking tiny pieces of reflective material into the wash – but don’t worry, while they wont break, they will still break-in like your favorite pair.The entire jean reflects light due to a coating of thousands of micro glasslike beads that reflect light back to the source. So that means if you’re biking at night and a car is headed your way, you’re pants are gonna glow. Perfect for nighttime biking, skateboarding, or just for looking really cool in any Instagram photo after 6PM.The denim itself is top notch, it’s from Japan and was created specially for the Montreal-based brand. It had a bit of stretch to it so you will still be able to jump around.Think about it, you can now ditch that orange reflective vest you’re always jogging around it. Yikes.The brand has also released a short film that demonstrates how these bad boys work.These Weird Guy’s are Available at Barney’s this fall, and to check out the brands other crazy styles, or to stay a head of the curve and see what’s to come, check out Naked & Famous’ official website here. The Future of Jeans is Here with these Alternative Fabrics to Cotton Denim 5 Canadian Lifestyle Brands You Need to Know The Best Travel and Adventure Documentaries on Netflix Right Now The 5 Best Margarita Mixes to Stock Up On Right Nowlast_img read more

Opposition say Ottawa courting trouble on foreign takeovers rules

by Julian Beltrame, The Canadian Press Posted Sep 17, 2012 6:35 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email OTTAWA – The Harper government is again under pressure to spell out clear rules on foreign investment following yet another spurned bid and in advance of the next big ask — the proposed Chinese acquisition of a major Canadian oil company.NDP and Liberal critics blasted the government for sitting on the issue for two years, saying they now are facing a decision this fall whether to accept China National Offshore Oil Corp.’s (CNOOC) $15.1-billion deal to buy Calgary-based Nexen Inc. without clear guidelines.Earlier Monday, U.S.-based Lowe’s withdrew its bid to acquire the Rona hardware chain, citing the Quebec company’s opposition.But analysts said another consideration was likely the political barriers put up from both leading parties in the province, including the Parti Quebecois minority government, that might have made approval under the Investment Canada Act problematic.“We don’t know what the Canadian government would have done with the Rona takeover, although clearly the government of Quebec was against it and that would have been an important factor in the process,” said Oliver Borgers, a partner in McCarthy Tetrault’s competition law group.The act calls for a demonstration of a “clear benefit” to Canada, but is unclear what that means beyond that a deal would create or preserve jobs, and generally benefit the economy.And that’s the problem, say critics — the ambiguity and secrecy of the process allows for too much discretion, including political pressures.“Ad hockery is what you get when you get when the government is negligent in setting the framework,” said Liberal deputy leader Ralph Goodale, a former finance minister.“What you’ve got is complete and utter chaos because it will all boil down to what Stephen Harper had for breakfast this morning and how he’s feeling about it.”The question of political factors coming into play was given more fuel Monday when Conservative MP Rob Anders said he opposed the Nexen takeover, referring to China as a “non-benevolent country.” He added that other MPs in the caucus agree.NDP energy and natural resources critic Peter Julian called on the government to conduct public hearings on the Nexen bid, accusing the government of listening mostly to CNOOC lobbyists.Although he did not answer the question directly, Industry Minister Christian Paradis said the Nexen deal will be “scrutinized very closely.” He added that what the NDP was proposing would “deter any form of investment in the country.”Following the 2010 rejection of BHP Billiton’s bid to buy Potash Corp. (TSX:POT), Ottawa suggested it would clear the confusion of what constitutes “net benefit” under the act, but has not issued new guidelines.Instead during the spring, Paradis tripled the threshold of purchases that would need to be reviewed to firms with $1 billion in asset value, and said Ottawa would be more open with the reasons behind its decisions.Opposition parties say the government is inviting trouble because more bids to buy into Canada’s rich resources sectors are almost certainly to occur.“This is a watershed. The size and scope of this takeover brings us into a whole new range in terms of potential acquisitions of Canadian energy companies,” said Julian. “So the whole issue around net benefit and how the government treats these applications has to be set down.”Julian said the current approach is not fair to Canadians, who have no faith in the process, or investors, who fear a strong public reaction will scuttle their bid.But despite some high-profile rejections in the last few years, there seems to be no loss of appetite from foreign investors for Canadian properties. One reason is that Canada’s relatively healthy economy and sound fiscal position has made it a safe heaven for investors.Borgers said to some extent investors expect some push-back when they seek to purchase assets in foreign countries.“I don’t think a couple of rejections is going to taint our reputation,” he said. “If you look to many of the large, important economies around the world, there have been many deals rejected and Canada would not be perceived to be far outside that pattern.” Opposition say Ottawa courting trouble on foreign takeovers rules read more