Former College Football Star Passed Away Yesterday

first_imgIndiana Hoosiers cheerleaders perform during the game against the Michigan Wolverines at Memorial Stadium.BLOOMINGTON, IN – OCTOBER 14: Indiana Hoosiers cheerleaders perform during the game against the Michigan Wolverines at Memorial Stadium on October 14, 2017 in Bloomington, Indiana. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)Bob Skoronski was a standout Indiana football player, and later, a star for the Green Bay Packers. He passed away on Tuesday morning at the age of 84.Skoronski unfortunately suffered from Alzheimer’s disease late in his life. The Packers announced the news of his passing on Tuesday afternoon:Bob Skoronski, offensive captain of the Vince Lombardi teams that won a record-tying three straight NFL championships in the 1960s and one of only nine players to play on all nine of Lombardi’s teams in Green Bay, died Tuesday morning in a suburb outside Madison, Wis. Skoronski, 84, died of Alzheimer’s disease.Bob Skoronski was a team captain for Indiana football, and the team’s MVP in 1955.From Indiana:Former Indiana offensive lineman and IU Athletics Hall of Famer Bob Skoronski died on Monday in Fitchburg, Wis. He was 84 years old.Skoronski played for the Hoosiers from 1953-55, served as team captain in 1954 and was named Indiana’s Most Valuable Player in 1955. He earned induction into the IU Athletics Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 1982, where he was the keynote speaker at the ceremony.According to an archived post from The Milwaukee Sentinel from when the Packers singed Skoronski, the team’s 1956 fifth-round pick, he also recovered eight opposing fumbles for the Hoosiers and played upwards of 50 minutes per game, indicating that he was a two-way player.Skoronski was the only Packer to play on every Vince Lombardi team. He started at left tackle for most of his 11-year career, winning five NFL Championships, the first two Super Bowls, and making a Pro Bowl in 1966.He is both an Indiana University and Green Bay Packers Hall of Famer.last_img read more