Former College Football Star Passed Away Yesterday

first_imgIndiana Hoosiers cheerleaders perform during the game against the Michigan Wolverines at Memorial Stadium.BLOOMINGTON, IN – OCTOBER 14: Indiana Hoosiers cheerleaders perform during the game against the Michigan Wolverines at Memorial Stadium on October 14, 2017 in Bloomington, Indiana. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)Bob Skoronski was a standout Indiana football player, and later, a star for the Green Bay Packers. He passed away on Tuesday morning at the age of 84.Skoronski unfortunately suffered from Alzheimer’s disease late in his life. The Packers announced the news of his passing on Tuesday afternoon:Bob Skoronski, offensive captain of the Vince Lombardi teams that won a record-tying three straight NFL championships in the 1960s and one of only nine players to play on all nine of Lombardi’s teams in Green Bay, died Tuesday morning in a suburb outside Madison, Wis. Skoronski, 84, died of Alzheimer’s disease.Bob Skoronski was a team captain for Indiana football, and the team’s MVP in 1955.From Indiana:Former Indiana offensive lineman and IU Athletics Hall of Famer Bob Skoronski died on Monday in Fitchburg, Wis. He was 84 years old.Skoronski played for the Hoosiers from 1953-55, served as team captain in 1954 and was named Indiana’s Most Valuable Player in 1955. He earned induction into the IU Athletics Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 1982, where he was the keynote speaker at the ceremony.According to an archived post from The Milwaukee Sentinel from when the Packers singed Skoronski, the team’s 1956 fifth-round pick, he also recovered eight opposing fumbles for the Hoosiers and played upwards of 50 minutes per game, indicating that he was a two-way player.Skoronski was the only Packer to play on every Vince Lombardi team. He started at left tackle for most of his 11-year career, winning five NFL Championships, the first two Super Bowls, and making a Pro Bowl in 1966.He is both an Indiana University and Green Bay Packers Hall of Famer.last_img read more

Nature Reserve Lands More Than Doubled

first_imgNova Scotia has more than doubled its nature reserve lands withthe designation of four new reserves and the expansion ofanother. The new reserves feature bogs, a mature Red Oak forest, an old-growth Acadian mixed forest, the endangered thread-leaved sundewplant, coastal headlands and barrens. “These reserves are peaceful places where we just let nature be,untouched,” said Environment and Labour Minister Kerry Morash.”We’re protecting these places so Nova Scotians will always enjoythe beauty of our natural environment and the knowledge gained bystudying it.” The province now has 11 nature reserves totalling 3,140 hectares,up from 1,360 hectares. They preserve and protect typical andspecial ecosystems, plants and animals. They also offer researchand education opportunities. The new reserves total about 1,700 hectares. Two are in YarmouthCounty — the Great Barren and Quinan Lakes Nature Reserve nearQuinan, and Spinneys Heath Nature Reserve near Argyle. The othersinclude Quinns Meadow Nature Reserve near Clyde River, ShelburneCo., and Duncans Cove Nature Reserve in Halifax RegionalMunicipality. MacFarlane Woods Nature Reserve, near Mabou, Inverness Co., wasdesignated in 1988 with 52.5 hectares. It is now 132 hectares –more than double its original size. About 58 per cent of thisland is owned by area resident Jim St. Clair who is allowing itto be used as part of the nature reserve. “From the time my ancestors arrived here in 1820, these woodshave provided clean air, protection against the wind, and aglorious site in all seasons,” said Mr. St. Clair. “Our familymade a good decision to set this area aside, and the partnershipwith the provincial government is helpful to preserve it forfuture generations to treasure.” The new and expanded nature reserves help meet commitments in the government’s green plan, Toward a Sustainable Environment, to protectmore of Nova Scotia’s natural environment. About 8.2 per cent of land in Nova Scotia is protected throughthe combined efforts of the provincial and federal governments,and organizations like the Nature Conservancy of Canada and theNova Scotia Nature Trust. All of Nova Scotia’s nature reserves are described on thedepartment’s website at www.gov.ns.ca/enla/pareas .last_img read more

Opposition say Ottawa courting trouble on foreign takeovers rules

by Julian Beltrame, The Canadian Press Posted Sep 17, 2012 6:35 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email OTTAWA – The Harper government is again under pressure to spell out clear rules on foreign investment following yet another spurned bid and in advance of the next big ask — the proposed Chinese acquisition of a major Canadian oil company.NDP and Liberal critics blasted the government for sitting on the issue for two years, saying they now are facing a decision this fall whether to accept China National Offshore Oil Corp.’s (CNOOC) $15.1-billion deal to buy Calgary-based Nexen Inc. without clear guidelines.Earlier Monday, U.S.-based Lowe’s withdrew its bid to acquire the Rona hardware chain, citing the Quebec company’s opposition.But analysts said another consideration was likely the political barriers put up from both leading parties in the province, including the Parti Quebecois minority government, that might have made approval under the Investment Canada Act problematic.“We don’t know what the Canadian government would have done with the Rona takeover, although clearly the government of Quebec was against it and that would have been an important factor in the process,” said Oliver Borgers, a partner in McCarthy Tetrault’s competition law group.The act calls for a demonstration of a “clear benefit” to Canada, but is unclear what that means beyond that a deal would create or preserve jobs, and generally benefit the economy.And that’s the problem, say critics — the ambiguity and secrecy of the process allows for too much discretion, including political pressures.“Ad hockery is what you get when you get when the government is negligent in setting the framework,” said Liberal deputy leader Ralph Goodale, a former finance minister.“What you’ve got is complete and utter chaos because it will all boil down to what Stephen Harper had for breakfast this morning and how he’s feeling about it.”The question of political factors coming into play was given more fuel Monday when Conservative MP Rob Anders said he opposed the Nexen takeover, referring to China as a “non-benevolent country.” He added that other MPs in the caucus agree.NDP energy and natural resources critic Peter Julian called on the government to conduct public hearings on the Nexen bid, accusing the government of listening mostly to CNOOC lobbyists.Although he did not answer the question directly, Industry Minister Christian Paradis said the Nexen deal will be “scrutinized very closely.” He added that what the NDP was proposing would “deter any form of investment in the country.”Following the 2010 rejection of BHP Billiton’s bid to buy Potash Corp. (TSX:POT), Ottawa suggested it would clear the confusion of what constitutes “net benefit” under the act, but has not issued new guidelines.Instead during the spring, Paradis tripled the threshold of purchases that would need to be reviewed to firms with $1 billion in asset value, and said Ottawa would be more open with the reasons behind its decisions.Opposition parties say the government is inviting trouble because more bids to buy into Canada’s rich resources sectors are almost certainly to occur.“This is a watershed. The size and scope of this takeover brings us into a whole new range in terms of potential acquisitions of Canadian energy companies,” said Julian. “So the whole issue around net benefit and how the government treats these applications has to be set down.”Julian said the current approach is not fair to Canadians, who have no faith in the process, or investors, who fear a strong public reaction will scuttle their bid.But despite some high-profile rejections in the last few years, there seems to be no loss of appetite from foreign investors for Canadian properties. One reason is that Canada’s relatively healthy economy and sound fiscal position has made it a safe heaven for investors.Borgers said to some extent investors expect some push-back when they seek to purchase assets in foreign countries.“I don’t think a couple of rejections is going to taint our reputation,” he said. “If you look to many of the large, important economies around the world, there have been many deals rejected and Canada would not be perceived to be far outside that pattern.” Opposition say Ottawa courting trouble on foreign takeovers rules read more